Following the Prime Minister’s announcement, we will be temporarily closing the institution on the 5th of November for one month.
We are planning to open again on the 3rd of December.
We will be running an online programme during this short period of closure for our members and supporters.
Contact us:
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]

What's on

John Gay’s The Beggar’s Opera

Originally from Barnstaple in Devon, John Gay (1685-1732) became one of London’s most renowned dramatists. His satirical ballad opera, The Beggar’s Opera, opened at Lincoln’s Inn Fields Theatre on 29 January 1728 and ran for 62 nights. Gay’s assault on the topsy-turvy morals, double-standards and self-interests of 18th century politics and aristocratic society remains one of the few 18th century plays still performed today.

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Tredgold’s The steam engine (1838)

Thomas Tredgold (1788-1829) was a self-taught engineer. He trained as an apprentice cabinetmaker in Durham and then in Scotland before moving to London to work at his uncle’s firm of […]

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Joseph de Mendoza y Ríos (1761–1816) and the ‘Longitude Problem’

Successful sea navigation relies on being able to determine latitude (how far north or south you are) and longitude (how far east or west). When the Greenwich Royal Observatory was founded on 22 June 1675, sailors were able to measure latitude at sea by observing the altitude of the sun at midday, but once out of sight of land they had no easy means of determining longitude.

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